BokehBlog

My little place to post about various photography items, and my shoots.

To content | To menu | To search

My Post Workflow

I have been asked a few times how I process my shots, so I decided to share my Post Workflow Process. From RAW image to Final Image.

I will walk you through this image of Bai Ling from StyleFashion in March of 2015. Feel free to click each image and see a bit larger version, the final is a decent size to view.

bai-ling-StyleFashion.jpg

Please note: There are numerous times I do a lot more, an sometimes I do a lot less. Example: for portraits, I usually add the slightest bit of vignette.

Step 1: The RAW file. This is the RAW file from the camera (.NEF in this case of my Nikon D810) I just converted it to JPG with out any processing, so you can view it here.

bai-ling-1-raw.jpg

Step 2: Bring the RAW file into Light Room and do some processing on the image. Color correct if I didnt get it 100% at time of shoot. A little contrast, bring out some shadows, fix exposure if my ISO was a little low (so I have less noise) de-noise a bit if there is some.

bai-ling-2-lr-room-develope.JPG

Step 3: Export from light room. Some people leave it alone right here. And that's fine, but I don't like to just use one tool, I will use many dedicated tools to really bring out a shot. This is the export from light room, and the side by side if you want to check it out.

bai-ling-3-lr.jpg

bai-ling-3-lr-compare.jpg

Step 4: Photoshop, this is where I clean/retouch the image. In this example, I cleaned the floor a little bit, and I removed a single hair that was coming across Bai Ling's eye.

bai-ling-4-ps-to-clean.jpg

Step 5: I use one of my Skin Retouching packages to clean the pores, removes lines under eyes, and remove thin wrinkles. One of the biggest mistakes I see a lot of retouchers do, is trying to just blur the skin. Bluring is not the best thing to do, its actually a pretty bad thing when its done. (note, blur can be used on a small imperfection, but not across the entire face)

bai-ling-5-skin.jpg

Step 6: I have a Digital Makeup package I use, but I only use it to add a small amount of a tweak here and there. If you try to do all the makeup in a package like this, it will look very very fake! Hence, I still hire Makeup Artists. Besides I don't want to retouch every shots makeup.

In this shot, I just added a bit of blush. Just a tiny bit!

bai-ling-6-makeup.jpg

Step 7: Skin softening, I use another package to Dynamically Soften the skin and not touch any other area of the picture. This is not a blur, and retains detail. You will see in when comparing the final image, look at the arms.

bai-ling-7-dyn-skin-soft.jpg

Step 8: Tonal Contrast, this is where I really make apparel pop. I only want this on the clothing, so I mask, and brush this only where needed. Do not use this on skin for fashion, as it will make them looked like an oiled up tanned body builder.

bai-ling-8-tonal-contrast.jpg

Step 9: Final image. I do not apply any sharpening to the image until final output/size. So in this step, I resized the image to the size I wanted, applied a small amount of sharpening (sometimes resize softens a bit) and exported the final image.

bai-ling-9-final.jpg

bai-ling-9-final-compare.jpg

Mike Bradley

Author: Mike Bradley

Stay in touch with the latest news and subscribe to the RSS Feed about this category

Comments (0)

Comments are closed


no attachment



You might also like

lynn-luu-profile.jpg

Shot Framing

Cropping in post does not make you lazy, it makes you productive. Shooting Hi-Res images (36mp for me) allows me to better frame in post.

Continue reading

Neewer-DS300-GRP.JPG

Managing your lighting controls

Just a quick glance in how I manage multiple Spedlights and Strobes from my camera. When using several lights on a shot, and you change concepts, you need to change some of the lighting, and its nice to adjust power levels or turns lights on/off right from the camera.

Continue reading